Top 5 Album-Inspiring Films w/ Hideous Divinity

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We talk film-themed metal, tours, and album inspiration with Enrico from Hideous Divinity on this week’s Friday Guest List.


Hi Enrico, how’s things going? Adveniens has been very well received since its release earlier this year, with many calling it your strongest work to date. Do you agree with this sentiment? Was there anything different in your approach to the music that you could attribute to this?

Hello there. All very well, from the HELL ON EARTH tour with the amazing guys in Cattle Decapitation and Broken Hope! I do agree we made a huge step forward with “Adveniens”: a step towards an obscure and more mature sound. During the last two years I totally fell in love with bands such as Sulphur Aeon, Akhlys, Adversarial, Inquisition… in a time when it seemed there was no chance for a new real breakthrough, these bands showed me a new way. To incorporate these dark elements in our style was not an easy task but we took the challenge and we managed to achieve our number one purpose: do something different.

Can you tell us a little about the album’s title? I’m not familiar with the word Adveniens. Is there a unifying concept between the songs?

“Adveniens” is an ancient Latin word meaning “arriving” referred by the Italian philosopher Massimo Cacciari to an “eternal, possible age, as achieved by the poet able to sublimate the suffering of the present, and therefore to foretell the catastrophic alternation of future ages”.

The entire album concept is a violent reflection on art, on the prophetic role of the artist, and on the innovative power of violence able to change language. It revolves around two main pillars: the philosophical one based on the work and reflections of Walter Benjamin about art in the age of mechanical reproduction, and mostly, about his messianic vision of history; the cinematographic one, strictly connected to the literary one, is given by the David Cronenberg movie “Videodrome”.

The band’s sound seems to straddle the edges of both brutal and technical death metal, two genres that are generally regarded as constantly striving to push things towards the extreme. Do you feel that the pressure to outdo your previous work is a healthy motivating factor or more of a hindrance for the genre in general?

Good question. I’d say both. There’s definitively pressure because the extreme metal scene is filled with talented bands now more than ever: natural consequence is, if you “fail” an album, you possibly won’t have a second chance. The only thing I’m personally not so concerned is the “technical” side of the thing. Even though we’re often labelled as technical DM band, I believe that refers more to bands like Necrophagist and Obscura. I’m not into technical display, I concentrate on the songs… also because I’m not that good with the guitar, haha.

Hahah, I think everyone can relate to that. What’s next for Hideous Divinity? I know a few members are involved in various other projects (Onryo, Nero di Marte, Aborted etc.), will you be touring extensively for this release?

We’re having a fantastic time with this amazing tour, Giulio will soon be busy with the recording sessions of Nero di Marte (another band I truly worship) and Stefano has a pretty tight schedule with Aborted (needless to say I love them too). I think then I’ll be able to do some brainstorming on my own and start working on new songs. Never too early to start.

Awesome! Your topic today relates to your interest in cinema. How integral is the influence of film on Hideous Divinity’s music?

In H.D., music and cinema have a symbiotic relationship. I consider cinema as the 20th century’s highest form of art, it has always been part of my life since I was a kid, and still does. Therefore, the choice of a constant movie-inspired concept in our albums was almost an automatic choice.

Right, well that leads us to the theme of the list you’re giving us today, which is the Top 5 Film Concepts You’d Like To Base An Album On. Let’s see what you’ve chosen…


1) Naked Lunch

This movie, together with the W.H. Burroughs book, has haunted me since when I was a teenager. Struggled all my life to find a meaning until I realized I had to let the movie go thru me… like water. And then try to see what was left in me afterwards. It’s not only a movie about drug addiction, it’s a movie about the evil in America that’s has been there “since before the Native Americans”, and about a methodology in self-destruction. I’ve incorporated elements of this movie since my early days at Hour Of Penance, but never dared to go for a full concept… maybe the time has finally come.


2) Only God Forgives

Possibly the most violent movie I’ve ever seen. A surrealistic Bangkok nightmare with the best photography ever brought on a screen. When you can’t tell reality from dream, you realize you’re in the hands of a maniac. This is the sort of movies I go for.

 


3) The Rover

Very few movies render the “end of it all” feeling like this one. Guy Pearce’s monologue once caught by the Police… simply devastating. Will we feel like him, once we understand it’s over for us too?

 


4) The Pillow Book

Not like anything I’ve seen before or after in my life. When symbolism reaches another level, and human body becomes a canvas. Problem is, how to use the concept in not a cheap, stupid gory way. Will have to work on that, I guess.

 


5) The Tree Of Life

Malick has the power to take you, within a number of frames, from an all-American drama to a documentary about cosmos and the birth of mercy. In conclusion, any violent emotion able to make you feel dizzy is suitable for a death metal album: like standing on the top of the highest tower in the world, with the rumbling noise of your fear filling your ears.


Pick up Adveniens through Everlasting Spew Records or digitally from Hideous Divinity’s Bandcamp page. Keep up to date with news on their Facebook page, and catch them currently on tour with Cattle Decapitation and Broken Hope.


Previously On The Friday Guest List

G.M of Barshasketh took us through 5 U.K Bands To Keep Your Eye On

Brendan of Convulsing talked 5 Otherworldly Albums & Lone Wolves.

Tanner of Madrost fried our brains with his Top 5 Sci-Fi Albums

K.T of Phylactery banged out his Top 5 Neck-Snapping Tracks.

 

Nick of Dumbsaint blew our ears out with his Top 5 Noise releases.

Reuben of Cadaveric Fumes hit us with his Top 5 New French Live Acts.

Contaminated blasted us with their Top 5 Underrated Nasty Death Metal Releases.

Eternal Champion slayed us with their Top 5 Sword-Wielding Anthems.

Saturndust took us into orbit with their Top 5 Spaaaced-out Albums.

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  • BobLoblaw

    The Rover is definitely underrated superb dystopia overshadowed by one of the main characters questionable choices in the past. Made me actually like the guy as an actor taking his medium seriously. As far as that niche goes I see it as only secondary to The Road and maybe parallel to A Boy and His Dog.

  • ok, i shall now check out Only God Forgives.
    love this band.

    • CT-12

      Don’t waste your time, Only God Forgives is one of the shittiest movies I’ve ever seen.

  • Eliza

    I really don’t know movies as well as I know music. And seeing how I don’t know music all that well either…

    • KJM, Anla’Shok

      Check out the works of Akira Kurosawa, David Lynch, Martin Scorsese, and Stanley Kubrick. That alone should keep you busy for a while.

      • Señor Jefe El Rossover

        Perfection.

        Oh, and Sam Raimi 😉

      • Eliza

        I have seen one Lynch film and two Kubrick ones, so I’ve already started!

        • KJM, Anla’Shok

          Nice! Which ones?

          • Eliza

            Eraserhead, The Shining and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

          • KJM, Anla’Shok

            Eraserhead is a good movie to see once, only once.

            I wish I could convince Stephen King that Kubrick’s Shining has merit.

            2001 is arguably the best Sci-Fi movie of all time.

          • Eliza

            All of these opinions are opinions that I agree with.

        • frozengoatsheadupanunsarse

          Add Ingmar Bergman and Robert Altman.

          • Eliza

            I’ve only seen The Seventh Seal, but, even so, Bergman is one of my favorites.

          • frozengoatsheadupanunsarse

            The Seventh Seal is magnificent. Would maybe recommend Wild Strawberries or Summer With Monica or Persona next (to get heavy), but its hard to go wrong with him.

            Also add Francois Truffaut and Luis Bunuel and Werner Herzog. I’ll stop now though 🙂

          • themaleshoegaze

            Buñuel, Buñuel and Buñuel first and foremost, all I’ve seen by him was impeccable. Only director I *really* strive to achieve completeness with, apart from maybe, dude must be in this thread, Hitchcock.

          • frozengoatsheadupanunsarse

            Hitchcock is a joy. I like his lighter side best (also The Birds because animals attack horror rules), but the sheer cinematic prowess of much of his work is captivating.

          • themaleshoegaze

            I like the ‘humourous’ ones a lot (Trouble with Harry, Family Plot), and I think you can find light or just plain funny moments in most Hitchcock, but I’m in total awe of the James Stewart masterpieces Vertigo and Rear Window. Pinnacles of film-making.

          • Eliza

            I can see you’re quite enthusiastic about film.

  • Naked breakfast>>>>>>naked lunch

  • Señor Jefe El Rossover

    “I consider cinema as the 20th century’s highest form of art”
    I’ve been saying this for a long time now, nice to see other people having that realization.

    Good read here, pretty interesting band.

    As far as movies I’d base an album on? Hmmm…. gotta say Krull, 2001, Highlander, those are what come to mind first.

    • RIP Literature 🙁

      • Señor Jefe El Rossover

        Cinema combines everything though! The storytelling of literature, the intricacies of art, the emotion of music and the human display of theater. Sure, there are a lot of trash movies, but you can say that about anything. If a director takes the time to make a perfect film, get the perfect angles, perfect cast, perfect shot, perfect music, etc. it is absolutely unstoppable.

        • Yeah u rite

          • Señor Jefe El Rossover

            Oh.

        • Howard Dean

          I’ve got to say that personally I’m still most impressed by opera. It combines all of the things you mentioned, but does it in a live setting. And humanity has been doing it for centuries already. Pretty rad.

          • Señor Jefe El Rossover

            I absolutely love Opera, however, what if something goes wrong on stage? There are no second takes and your experience could be ruined. Not trying to downplay all that goes into those performances, it is quite astonishing, but do you see where I’m going with this?

          • Howard Dean

            I think that’s exactly why I’m so impressed with it. There are no do-overs. Every piece of the performance needs to be perfect–or as near perfect as possible in order to prevent diminishing impact. From the librettist to the composer to the conductor and the orchestra and vocal performers, everybody makes it work in a live setting. One take. No edits. For me, that’s just awesome.

          • Señor Jefe El Rossover

            I absolutely agree with you on all points here! As I said, truly amazing what they can do.

            But, for example, film allows you to capture the slighest details, a twitch in the actors face from a tense moment, the last whisper of breath from a dying character, the narrowing of the eyes, a shift in posture before a final action. All of these things to me, play into how intricate a film can be, something you can’t focus on completely in a stage performance. There is a boundary between stage and audience, meanwhile film puts you straight into the moment, the action, everything.

          • Óðinn

            Meh. Not to downplay their talent, but opera performers do the same shows over and over again. It’s not really a big feat to perform the same show when you’ve done it hundreds or thousand of times.

          • Lacertilian

            Yeah I kinda took what he was saying as it being the highest form of art that developed during that particular time-period. Whereas literature and opera both perhaps peaked in earlier centuries.

          • Howard Dean

            Ah, I see. I’d tend to agree then, I guess. Movies > performance art and other 20th century inventions.

      • Eliza

        RIP my dreams of being an author. :,(

        • Señor Jefe El Rossover

          Never stop!!! That’s not my intention with this. Personally, music is still number 1 for me, but I recognize a “higher form” when I see it.

          • Eliza

            Thanks for the encouragement! Same here, though I don’t think there is a higher form of art. What you can get out of one art form you can’t get out of the other. Looking at a painting will not have the same effect on you as listening to a song will. I could develop this more if I knew more about art, so, yeah. Just my opinion.

          • Stand-up comedy is the new highest form.

          • Señor Jefe El Rossover

            I must bow down to your great wisdom. I once was blind, but now I see.

          • BobLoblaw

            Look no further than 3 Mics with Neal Brennan.

          • Meh. Close but no Stanhope, Maron oe CK.

          • BobLoblaw

            Completely different thing. Stanhope, Burr, Notaro, C.K, Oswalt, Norton, Maron, etc are all great but they dont do what Brennan did with that. As he alluded to its more of a one man show than a standup performance. Though the standup is excellent. “Butt cheeks on swole”

          • True. He’s got great potential.

          • BobLoblaw

            That was his first recorded stand up performance (if you dont take The Meltdown performance into account). I think that was the realization of his potential past Chappelle Show. Hes not really a stand up comedian, more of a storyteller and certainly a great writer.

          • BobLoblaw

            Also, as much as I initially loved C.K, hes grown quite stale. I couldnt get into his last special as much as I wanted to. Hes done some amazing stuff in the comedy and television forums but his standup has been lackluster for the past two hour specials.

        • You and me both…

          • Eliza

            *looks at the pile of first drafts*
            *sighs*

          • *looks at pile of 5th drafts*
            *dies*

        • KJM, Anla’Shok

          Keep at it. Writing is hard work.

          • Eliza

            Especially when you are unable to ever be satisfied with your work and do re-writes constantly.

    • Señor Jefe El Rossover

      And some albums that are based on movies:

      https://youtu.be/4bSEJugcuxs

      https://youtu.be/zqHMDGiORcA

      • Janitor Jim Duggan

        I didn’t enjoy that Primus album that much.

        • Señor Jefe El Rossover

          JJD PLZ! Quit being lame!

          • Janitor Jim Duggan

            It wasn’t as good as I had hoped. I hope the new one is good.

    • Sorry, pretty sure anime is the highest form of art

      • Señor Jefe El Rossover

        FOAD

  • Howard Dean

    Reading the Beat Generation authors is like repeatedly stabbing yourself in the chest with a pair of scissors, only worse. You don’t get the sweet release of death afterwards.

    • Janitor Jim Duggan

      You don’t like Jack Kerouac? I don’t read much but he was a good writer.

      • Howard Dean

        Kerouac, Burroughs, Ginsberg, etc give me this kind of reaction, Janitor Jim:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRIDQonQJUM

        • Señor Jefe El Rossover

          Which Burroughs are we talking about here?

          • Howard Dean

            William S.

          • Señor Jefe El Rossover

            Okay, good.

        • Janitor Jim Duggan

          I love this video. The state of Lex Luger here is depressing.

        • KJM, Anla’Shok

          Confirmed. I’ll pass on ever reading any of those authors again.

  • frozengoatsheadupanunsarse

    I really like the film of Naked Lunch, but its a bit too much of a straight wash. Sure, there’s some homosexuality, some weirdness, but it doesn’t really capture the in your face gay aspect too well. Also I really wanted to see the auto-erotic asphyxiation/pegging/spontaneous combustion scene. But still its a heck of a lot of fun, cool performances (pity we lost Peter Weller to fine art, he could have really gone on), stellar FX work. Thought provoking on the relationship between art and artist too. And if I’m not mistaken Burroughs gave it a thumbs up.

    Anyway this was an excellent read. Kudos. I consider literature the highest form of art and probably always will, but cinema is surely the highest form of mass art. Never heard of The Rover before but Guy Pearce rocks so I’ll look it out.

    I would like to hear some kind of progressive metal album based on Wax, Or The Discovery Of Television Among The Bees (1991).

    • Lacertilian

      My interpretation was that Enrico was implying cinema peaked as an art-form in the 19th century, whereas literature possibly had its highest moments during prior periods. It’s likely that I’m totally wrong though. I’m just glad you got to this post, as when compiling it I thought it would appeal to your interests.

  • KJM, Anla’Shok

    Naked Lunch is the rare instance where I actually liked the movie better than the book.

  • Rolderathis

    I read Naked Lunch not too long ago, really perverse for sure. All I remember is the repeated use of the phrase “stench of penetrated rectums” and that a guy gets fucked by a sheep in prison towards the beginning. I like a little warm-up before I move on to heavier reading.

  • themaleshoegaze

    Well, a Walter Benjamin-reference in a metal interview, that’s pretty damn cool, probably seldom to spot, if at all, but if it happens chances are pretty high it’s on ToH, that’s why I’m here!
    I’ll take the rare chance and list my top five/top of my head-metal relatable Benjamin-moments:

    5) His Sleep-before-the-fact chronicled cannabis experimentation.
    4) The idea of a narrator persona that made its way through insanity to tell its stories from beyond that realm developed in his essay on Swiss genius Robert Walser.
    3) His distinction of Tragedy and (Baroque, German) Trauerspiel, in which the world becomes helpless spectator of unfolding, ever-repeating misery (Iirc)
    2) The Angel of History (alluded to above) watching a constant display of total destruction.
    1) The concept of a perpetual ‘state of emergency’ as enabler of dictatorship/absolute reign

    That’s it, thanks for indulging me, Hideous Divinity’s music shall be checked out later today!