Premiere: ONRYŌ Will Grind Your Brain to Dust with the Full Stream of MŪTO

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Last Monday, my squamate reptile in arms encouraged you to light the fires of revolution with Onryō’s “The Pyromaniac – Anarchogrind.” Today we’re proud as hell to unleash the band’s full quantum singularity EP Mūto. Sit with me and watch the entirety of creation spin into an eternal maelstrom of super dense oblivion over the course of 13 of the most vicious minutes of grind and mathcore ever unleashed.

As you’ll soon witness when you stab play below, Lacertilian wasn’t joking when he opined that “The Pyromaniac – Anarchogrind” is perhaps the most straightforward track on the impossibly fast and impossibly furious EP. The remainder of the four tracks come spiraling out of the ether like an unabating wave of all-consuming, mass-obliterating energy. It’s as if guitarists Alessio Cattaneo and Edoardo Spadoni got together with drummer Giulio Galati after hearing Calculating Infinity and Nano-Nucleonic Cyborg Summoning and tossed out all of those pesky normal riffs and conventional structures that popped up between the string bends and lightning scale runs. The end result is a four track grinder that distills the rampant gluttony of grind and the abrasive subversion of mathcore into a single super-density. Try headbanging to this, and you’ll end up experiencing the existential body horror of those poor suckers in Jacob’s Ladder.

Of the two new tracks you’ll hear today, my favorite is undoubtedly the unabashedly absurd “Sickness and Aluminum Foil Helmets;” the midst of a skronkadelic cacophony is surely the last place you’d expect to find a sexy sax riff, and yet, there it is, baring itself for your seduction and luring you one step closer to the gaping maw of universal cataclysm like some infernal siren as pitch squeals and hellish growls signal the end of all things. That the song studders to such an abrupt and violent end feels only fitting after the atrocities you’ve seen and heard. There’s no coming back from this.

In that way, Mūto’s brief 13 minute runtime is a blessing. The human mind (and neck and spine and nervous system) can only endure exposure to such force for so long. Four tracks. 13 minutes. Endless, pulverizing heaviness. This is Onryō’s Mūto. Pick it up at Bandcamp tomorrow, June 20th, and go witness the birth of a black hole on Facebook.