Groundbreakers: Bathory – Hammerheart

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Few bands in the extreme metal pantheon can claim credit for revolutionizing or birthing a single branch of the heavy metal tree; even fewer can claim to have done it twice. Today we venerate one of those bands by examining one of the most critical works for the development of extreme metal. All hail Sweden’s Bathory.

Bathory’s early works are timeless classics considered by some to be “the blueprint for Scandinavian black metal.” However, we aren’t here to look at those albums. Nor are we here to examine Blood Fire Death. As influential as that album is, the pagan seed planted by front man Quorthon would not actually germinate into the mighty Yggdrasil of viking metal until today’s entry, Hammerheart. To understand this album, we must look both to the past and to the future.

Prior to Hammerheart‘s release in 1990, there was no viking metal subgenre. Black metal was only just beginning to find its footing. Though blasphemy was already beginning to be encoded into the DNA of extreme metal, no one had truly embraced the pagan roots of Norse culture to marry it so completely with heavy metal. True, bands like Led ZeppelinManowar, and Grave Digger had touched on Norse and pagan themes, but these attempts lacked the conviction of a true son of the North and were merely done for artistic flair. Then Quorthon stumbled upon a formula, a way to both embrace the grand heritage of opposition to religion and to capture the bombastic spirit of glory of Norse myth. The two first viking metal songs on Blood Fire Death were just the experiment. Hammerheart was the true declaration of purpose, an album that would pillage and destroy and leave only scorched earth in its wake as it pursued ascension to Valhalla.

Many others would follow in Bathory’s wake. Just a few short years later, Enslaved would take up the mantle of pagan retribution, traveling about like Odin, spinning epic tales of glory and majesty. Other brothers in arms would answer the call as well. Amon Amarth, Kampfar, and Slechtvalk would all lift their swords for the frozen north, but each would do so in their way, and few would do so with the vigor and earnestness of Bathory.

In truth, it’s Quorthon’s passion that makes Hammerheart so special. From the vocal arrangements to the battle-ready riffs to the majestic song structures themselves, every facet of this album speaks to Quorthon’s earnestness and desire to extol the virtues of his native land’s mythological legacy. To this end, Quorthon assumed complete creative control of Bathory around the time of this release, remaining the band’s sole true member (though others would collaborate on albums) until his death in 2004.

Quorthon’s zeal is perhaps most evident in the vocals on this album. Let’s be honest about something; Quorthon’s shouting here is rough, often times extending well beyond his natural range and placing an obvious strain on his vocal chords. However, his barks and shouts are so passionate that you can’t help but feel your heart leap with each battle cry. As rough as they are, the main vocals are perfect for what he was trying to achieve, and any more polish would likely sound false. This passion is only enhanced by the background vocals, also performed by Quorthon himself. For every battle-weary croak urging you to action, there’s a melodic backing track that flits about like glorious valkyries, urging you to conquest and victory. I challenge you to listen to Quorthon yell “Bap-tised. In!” and not respond with “Fire and ice!”

Speaking of “Baptised in Fire and Ice”, Quorthon’s passionate, idiosyncratic vocals find their counterpoint in his carefully crafted riffs. Every note, every riff, every phrasing choice on this album is perfect for going to battle, each a true offering to the one-eyed god. It’s as though Quorthon, like the viking warriors before him crafting swords from the steel found in peat moss, plucked the fibers of these riffs from the bountiful flesh of Midgard itself. From the berzerker picking of the intro to “Baptised in Fire and Ice” to the menacing riff of “Father to Son” that circles you like a ravenous kraken claiming victims of a shipwreck, there isn’t a single lackluster guitar moment on the album. Each riff is another sword with which to strike down your foes.

Not to be outdone, the rhythm section on this album forms an impenetrable shield line that bolsters the efforts of the deadly riffs. Kothaar’s bass adds the hefty muscle a warrior needs to endure charge after charge from enemy lines, but it’s Vvornth’s drum work that truly shines. The rhythms are simple and bold, often conjuring images of thunder and lightning pummeling the frozen shores. The simple, pneumatic pulse of the drums in “Shores in Flames” are especially emblematic of the rhtyhmic might of this album, dealing hammer blow after hammer blow like Asator’s lightning-charged Mjolnir striking down the venomous world serpent.

These elements alone would be nothing without the expert songwriting skill possessed by Quorthon. Though most of the songs on the album are on the long-side, none overstay their welcome. Instead, each draws out every element to perfect, precise effect, knowing exactly when to alternate between melodic vocal line, hammering drum battery, or burning lead track shimmering with Surtur’s flame. Each is an epic tale of heroism in its own right, and removing any song from the album (except perhaps the windswept “Outro”) would cause this Bifrost bridge to immortality to lose a bit of its luster.

In essence, Quorthon took ownership of a long line of tradition and heroic myth and weaved it into his own legendary tale, one that would forever loom tall like an Aesir amongst the mortal workings of later storytellers. Quorthon established his legacy with Hammerheart, and though he has passed on to Odin’s Hall, his mighty deeds remain an inspiration to all warriors who fight for the north. Hail!


Groundbreakers is the Toilet ov Hell’s Hall ov Fame where we induct some of the most important and influential metal albums of all time. Catch up on previous entries into this hallowed bowl.

Neurosis – Souls at Zero
Death – Symbolic
Fear Factory Demanufacture
Voivod – Killing Technology
Today is the DayTemple of the Morning Star
Avenged Sevenfold – City of Evil
The Moody Blues – Days of Future Passed
Acid BathWhen the Kite String Pops
Ministry – The Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Taste
Vulcano – Bloody Vengeance
Sleep Holy Mountain
Kreator – Pleasure to Kill
Kayo Dot – Choirs of the eye
Thin Lizzy – Thunder and Lightning
Type O Negative – Bloody Kisses

  • Paddlin’ Rites ov Beargod

    The fact this is not a Cesiumworm article is very dissapointing indeed. You have failed me, nay all of us.

    • Vote for Jeb

      I tried to convince him to do it :/

      • I would love to see you try to convince yourself to do it.

        #perplexed

  • A lot of his albums could be called groundbreaking.

    • Vote for Jeb

      Agreed.

    • more beer

      Without a doubt. I met Quorthon outside a Venom show in 87. I talked to him for about 15 minutes. It was pretty cool.

      • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

        Well fuck, that’s a rad friggin’ story.

        • more beer

          Sometimes it`s good to be an old guy,

          • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

            In this case, totally.

          • more beer

            It`s too bad Bathory didn`t play that night. One night with Carnivore and Overkill and the other night with Voi Vod and the Cro Mags were pretty good fucking shows.

      • InfinityOfThoughts

        Dude, that’s fucking awesome!!

      • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample
        • more beer

          But you will never be able to say you met the man.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            I’ve also met musicians you’ll probably never get to meet, so Nyeah, Squidward, Nyeah!

          • more beer

            Touche.

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      Indeed. Shit the first 6 are mandatory.

      • RJA

        That’s very true – the first 6 would be considered mandatory – not many bands I would say have 6. I personally like requiem and octagon too, but certainly not mandatory.
        Also, fantastic work on the article W.

        • Vote for Jeb

          THANKS

        • Max

          Octagon is underrated.

      • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

        I honestly can’t think of any bad Bathory records.

  • The writing in this article made me appreciate this record even more, señor Doctor. Every description about both the technique and the passion behind the writing is what I feel, besides those weird things like grainy bubbles with gold, brown, orange and green colors when my sensibilities arose.

    Incredible album. I always felt that Quorthon was one of those singers that weren’t accomplished with the technique, but with that unearth passion he could give a vivid imagery of his thoughts and views. He is one of those figures that are truly missed and would have recorded more kickass music if his destiny wasn’t cut so early.

    From the narrative side, I think that Hammerheart was groundbreaking, indeed. The lyrics have this double motif in which they serve as short tales, and also as historical rescues to the Norse culture. The structures are simple, but he put emphasis on certain topics that could be analyzed as a complex display of the culture-individual relation.

    Great feature and kudos, Dubz.

    • Your english>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      Fine work!

      GL

      • I don’t know if my spanglish is getting worse or my inglés is getting better!

      • ME GORAK B.C.™

        LINK MAKE WORD BETTER GORAK!!!!!!!!!!

        GORAK

      • Dave Vincent’s Perm

        So are you actual George Lynch or

        • Indeed!

          GL

          • Dave Vincent’s Perm

            That’s pretty awesome. How’s the Randall deal going?

          • It is saturated with power metal at the moment. Here is my new logo! (refresh for image)

          • Dave Vincent’s Perm

            Y’know I find it rather surprising that you’re a fan of Revenge.

  • King Shit of Fuck Mountain
    • Vote for Jeb

      Ewwww

      • Vote for Jeb

        Regarding the album art, that is.

        • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

          I figured that’s what you meant, doc.

        • Reminds me of another Season 4 X-Files episode “Leonard Betts” which I watched on Monday. This scene here. Real nasty.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bTZarKComA

          • Vote for Jeb

            Oh yah, I remember this episode now. So strange.

          • I remember this. I was scared as fuck.

          • Yeah, I could see why. Pretty gnarly stuff.

    • This is nasty. It’s got that gory Impetigo feel going which I can dig.

      • Intresting, it looks like they have not released anything since 1990. Unless you count that split with Nunslaughter 4 years ago.

      • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

        Checking it out for the Impetigo feel alone! First time I’ve seen anyone mention them on here.

  • <3 My favorite Bathory album. I usually start on this track, then repeat all the way back around https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDpc-831GPs

  • Dagon

    Nice! Bathory and Carcass are definitely in a realm of their own when it comes to birthing genres. It’s not that they’re the best, but they were definitely pioneers. It’s kinda like those older UFC fighters who held belts in multiple weight classes.

    Except Bathory and Carcass are the best, who am I kidding?

  • Mvthvr Shvbvbv 8

    The intro paired with the opening song give me the chills, and strength to conquer mine enemies in the throes of battle. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SC6DvbEVHcI

  • Guppusmaximus
    • Vote for Jeb

      There aren’t many on the list 😉

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      I’ll still give that one to Possessed.

      EDIT: Death metal, that is…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tI0S5xn8rQo

      • Guppusmaximus

        While I respect the influence, the vocals were just not there yet, imho.

        • Death never really went beyond the early death/thrash vocal style though

        • more beer

          There was no blueprint for death metal vocals when this came out.

          • True. That’s what I like about that time. That whole mix of death metal vocals. Pretty cool time!

          • more beer

            It was a very cool time. Glad I got to see the original Possessed lineup.

          • Yup. You son of a bitch.

          • more beer

            I`m old and been doing this for a long time.

          • Glad you can share the stories. I would have really loved to have been to a lot of these classic shows.

          • more beer

            Enjoy your youth. Even now I probably go to more shows than a lot of people here. The secret is no wife or kids.

          • I hear that man. Wish shows were closer to me though. Although depending on my current job situation I may be moving so there is that.

          • more beer

            If you have to shop your resume. Do it in places with good job markets with a good scene.

          • Guppusmaximus

            True..but Chuck managed to lay down the benchmark that guys like Tardy expanded upon.

          • more beer

            Except Seven Churches came out 2 years before Scream Bloody Gore. So like I said there was no blueprint for death metal vocals.

          • ME GORAK B.C.™

            MANTAS DEMO FEAT. CHUCK & KAM LEE OV MASSACRE!!!!
            1984!!!!!
            https://youtu.be/rvxBw0kUXfM

          • more beer

            How many copy’s of this demo do you think they made? Things were much different back then. It probably wasn`t the huge influence you think it was. It probably got handed out to friends, people at shows in their local area. Maybe traded a little. Most bands weren`t heard by a lot of people until they an album out.

          • ME GORAK B.C.™

            IT PROBABLY NOT INFLENCE!!!!! LOTS BANDS OVER WORLD START USING DEATH METAL SOUNDS FROM 83-90!!!!! NAPALM DEATH, OBITUARY, CELTIC FROST, SEPULTURA ETC!!!!!

          • more beer

            Yes they were but I think Seven Churches at the time was a little more extreme than Celtic Frost and was 2 years before Death.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            Wrong! The original death metal vocalist:

            http://media.salon.com/2001/05/tom_waits.jpg

          • more beer

            He`s barely a metal vocalist.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            But but those growls, mayn, those growls!

          • more beer

            Are terrible.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            You’re definitely the first person I’ve ever known that doesn’t like Tom Waits.

          • more beer

            Too fucking weird for me.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            There’s such a thing in music?

      • more beer

        I`m going to have to agree with this.

    • Idk about tech death, there were plenty of bands doing that before Death, such as Nocturnus, Atheist, and arguably quite a few others depending on your interpretation of their albums’ genres.

      https://rateyourmusic.com/genre/Technical+Death+Metal/

      • Vote for Jeb

        Nocturnus and Atheist >>>

        • It has been far too long since i’ve listened to Atheist

          • Vote for Jeb

            For whatever reason, folks tend to overlook them quite a bit. Elements is a monstrous album

          • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

            Atheist was good. So ahead of their time.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            And those bass lines. Oh lawdy, dem bass lines!

          • that’s the one people ignore the most! It is a wonky album, to be sure. I remember when I first pirated it back in the day when that was still a thing I did, the order wasn’t right and I ended up listening to it like 10 times in order of track length because I didn’t know any better

          • Vote for Jeb

            That conversation we had the other day about the forward-thinking osdm bands? I definitely had them in mind. I even liked Jupiter.

          • someone told me Jupiter was a shitty metalcore album.

            I told her she was a poser.

          • Vote for Jeb

            That makes no sense.

          • Yeah she was bragging about getting to see Poison and didn’t know any bands I was name dropping, I had no idea where she came from but she was fucking stupid

          • Guppusmaximus

            I’d say they were more apt to thinking outside of the box back then they are now. Jupiter just didn’t do it for me because of “Unquestionable” & “Elements”. I love that Jazz/ Salsa instrumental they do. It was like, holy fuck these guys can do whatever they want.

          • Guppusmaximus

            Overlooked?! Dude, no one knew what to make of “Unquestionable” came out. It actually didn’t sit too well with the Death Metal purists at the time. I love that album, bought it when it came out and still jam it fairly regularly. As for “Elements” – it’s absolutely timeless because of the Latin elements (no pun). I loved how they wanted to do a Death Metal album without blast beats…amazing stuff.

          • Vote for Jeb

            I mean today, not then. I don’t see Atheist pop up in conversations today about great osdm very often.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            They put out a new one not too long ago. It’s not terrible, but definitely not up to par with their old stuff. And none of the funky basslines I loved so much on their past CDs.

          • Vote for Jeb

            You mean Jupiter, the album I mentioned elsewhere in this discussion?

          • School Of Hard Plops

            Yeah, that one.

      • Guppusmaximus

        Eh, “Piece of Time” was fairly sloppy for a Death Metal album & “Unquestionable”, to me, was Progressive Death Metal (the fusion of Jazz-like riffs)

        Again, Nocturnus didn’t really have the vocal strength but I’m certain the influence was there considering they were both from Florida.

        • I could understand calling Nocturnus sloppy, but Piece of Time? that thing is a ripper and absurdly tight

          • Guppusmaximus

            Never cared for it…Maybe it’s the production that’s throwing me off. It just sounded horrible next to “Unquestionable”

          • I love both near equally

          • Guppusmaximus

            For me, it was night & day especially comparing “Piece” with “Spiritual Healing”.

          • I’ve never gotten into Death. Very little that they’ve written appeals to me. This is one of them, and also one of my favorite death metal songs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYYUR21_G9c

          • Guppusmaximus

            That’s cool. I just love how Chuck incorporated more melody into his work as they progressed. “Spiritual” has moments that you didn’t expect back in ’90 especially the Middle Eastern flair in the beginning of this one:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Htu0Y-XUFBo&list=PLTExqHkJRFQTWxtdb-_tWC7r6EzyK3B0Q&index=4

          • My key issue with death’s music is how jarring the transitions (or really, the lack of any good transitions) are. the majority of death riffs could be transplanted from one song to another and would be just as jolting as where they were originally.

          • Guppusmaximus

            I don’t hear that. I do hear inklings of the Progressive route they were about to head in, but, I am always drawn to sweeping time changes cued by the dominant riff for that part of the song. This album does it so often and smoothly because the riff sounds different once the rest of band kicks in.

          • Paddlin’ Rites ov Beargod

            Apart from the dull Spiritual Healing I like all Death albums, but I don’t think they were the best at anything they dabbled in.

          • Guppusmaximus

            I guess if you consider Groove & Melody dull… to each their own.

          • Paddlin’ Rites ov Beargod

            Riffs don’t really flow, songwriting lacks the hooks the other albums have.
            Having a melody and being able to groove don’t make a song. Not a good one at least, but as you say – to each his own.

          • Guppusmaximus

            We definitely hear things differently. To me, the memorable riffs and hooks is what made this album superior to their first two. IMHO, it really defined a catchy-ness that didn’t exist in Death Metal.

          • I remember being slow to get into death metal because all I was trying was Death, and none of it really got to me. Everyone told me how much I should love them and how good they were and i was just like “uhh… nah I’ll stick with boring melodeath.”

            Then one day I heard World Eater and it was like NOPE ONLY DEATH IS REAL from then on out

          • Paddlin’ Rites ov Beargod

            I can see that, Death is, shall we say, very bluntly whatever they tried to be at any given time.
            Bolt Thrower had more melody, and better riffs.

            Glad I got to see Kiddie Kearns perform with them.

          • I must have listened to Death’s Symbolic dozens, if not hundreds of times in college trying to figure out what I was supposed to love about it, and strangely I can recall not a single riff from it except the guitar lead in crystal mountain during the chorus.

            edit: looked at song titles to refresh my memory, getting a couple riffs back

          • Paddlin’ Rites ov Beargod

            Symbolic and Human both do that to me, and I’ve heard each countless of times. The rest have stayed better.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            You’d probably love Control Denied, when Chuck swung over into more prog and power metal pieces. Pharaoh, the singer’s band afterwards, is probably right up your alley as well.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6REj3t64f4E

          • Pharaoh >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Control Denied

          • School Of Hard Plops

            Pharaoh is the tits! I think they put out a new one a couple of years ago.

          • Based Potoo

            Fuck you. Spiritual Healing is better than their first two albums every day of every year!

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            Not even ‘Symbolic’?!?! *locker creaks open*

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            Tight, but the production wasn’t exactly up to snuff. Hopefully they’ve remastered it, at least to the point it doesn’t sound like it was recorded on mini-cassette in an oil drum.

        • “Piece of Time” – “Fairly sloppy”.

          Man, that sentence hurt me. They weren’t amateurs when they released their first album. I know it doesn’t have the punch of Unquestionable or the proggy of Elements, but that record isn’t sloppy at all. The RAVAGER demos were another story.

          http://i.imgur.com/lKaicvA.jpg

  • I remember I read some interviews of Quorthon saying that he barely listened metal music besides some of his favorite classics like Motörhead. He said every inspiration for the late Bathory albums were from hikes, literature and classical music, mostly from Wagner.

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      He also claimed he never heard Venom, which is still hard to believe. But maybe he actually was telling the truth.

      • more beer

        Maybe not before his first album. But having seen met him outside of Venom makes me beg to differ.

        • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

          Shit, you make a good point, and since you actually met him, the gives it more credence.

          • more beer

            It wasn`t something I was gonna forget. Along with this poster glued to the the front of the white limo he jumped out of.

          • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

            Nice.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            By limo, you mean Viking ship being rowed by enslaved villagers, right?

          • more beer

            N he was still doing black metal at that point in time. I mean big white Lincoln Town Car.

      • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

        It would definitely be one MAJOR coincidence if he didn’t. The second CD practically oozes Venom influence, a lot more so than Motorhead influence.

    • YAAAAAASSSSSSSSSSS

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      So so so so fucking savage.

    • Vote for Jeb

      Just finished listening to this a bit ago. My butt was chopped off.

      • I’m 4 songs into it now. It hurts.

      • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

        RIP, W.’s butt…..

        • Vote for Jeb

          To be fair, I didn’t have much of one to begin with.

          • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

            The story just gets sadder.

        • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample
    • Jesus Fucking Christ that is heavy.

    • Hubert

      This is deadening me. I am chewing though.

      • Hubert,

        I have a surprise for you.

        GL

        • Hubert

          What?

          • Hubert,

            I have something for you. But, you are going to have to wait till the weekend.

            GL

          • Hubert

            Consider my curiosity piqued.

          • You will not be disappointed, friend. I guarantee it.

          • Hubert

            I’m super curious right now.

          • InfinityOfThoughts

            Hail Satan?

          • The goat demands sacrifices to ease the wait.

          • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

            *tosses him a soda can to chew on*

    • more beer

      This fucking slays!

      • Hubert

        It does

    • BEARD-SPLITTER

      … meh

      *runs and hides

      • Paddlin’ Rites ov Beargod

        Hate Nomad.

    • Hubert

      I’m on the third song right now. My outlook on life is changing.

    • Janitor Jim Duggan

      This hurts my soul. It’s so beautiful. Would destroy soul again/10.

    • InfinityOfThoughts

      Welp, looks like my afternoon is now solidly booked…thrashing like a maniac.

  • InfinityOfThoughts

    I had a premonition last night that I’d be reading about Bathory on this site in the coming future. Am I a psychic?

    Also: currently finishing a BBQ lunch, having a beer, then its off to do chores…whilst blasting some Hammerheart.

    • Vote for Jeb

      You have ESP.

      • InfinityOfThoughts

        Well, actually I did have (an five string bass made by) ESP but I no longer have it.

        • Waynecro

          I have an ESP F-205, and I love that fucking thing.

          • Lacertilian

            Nice, I have an LTD F-250.
            If only I could afford the ESP version.

          • Waynecro

            Cover/scratch the “LTD” off the headstock. Boom! Instant ESP. Impress all your friends with an instrument from the F series that isn’t an LTD!

          • Lacertilian

            I’ll just chuck some nice EMG’s in there and get decent sound anyways.

  • Max

    A stellar work indeed; my second favourite Bathory album after the pinnacle opus Blood Fire Death, and that not by a long shot. This write-up pretty much captures everything I like about it, too – while not being afraid to point out the shortcomings which always added their own charm to the Bathory hallmark. So well done there, W!

    The only cut on the album I don’t get into is “One Rode to Asa Bay”. It has some of the best lyrics I’ve ever read in metal; but the actual song is a bit limp compared to everything before it. Then again, even that’s not a problem for me since I usually just run the record all the way up to “Home of Once Brave” which serves as an awesome closer anyway. How the fuck he managed to perfectly evoke the “cold black Nordic sea” with that song’s arrangement, I’ll never truly know. The entire album is so evocative of its theme; it might be the ultimate concept album, unintentionally.

    The other two efforts in the “Viking trilogy”, Twilight of the Gods and Blood On Ice, were for me a disappointment compared to this, despite a few good songs between them that do manage to capture the same spirit. But no matter; I’ll always have Hammerheart.

    Fun fact: That droning noise at the end of “Shores in Flames” is apparently a next door neighbour’s lawnmower leaking onto the tape.

    • Vote for Jeb

      That IS a fun fact.

  • Waynecro

    Great article, W. The great writing on this website certainly gives me a nice break from all the garbage writing I have to edit at work.

  • Boss the Ross

    Hail!

  • Abe Vigoda’s Oily Stool Sample

    Summon the beer wenches, and many a mighty toast to Quorthon!

    http://media.giphy.com/media/3o85xnWxG2TUw1S8co/giphy.gif

    Can’t forget Thyrfing when mentioning other Swedish viking metal bands who paved the way.

  • Eliza

    Coincidentally, I had the Immigrant Song stuck in my head all day.