30 years on, Reign In Blood Is Still Fucking Garbage!

Next week marks 30 years since the release of one of metal’s most historic records. While other albums of its age have smoothly transitioned into adulthood, Slayer‘s break-through is still out partying hard, exchanging bodily fluids with reckless abandon, and waking up with no knowledge of where it’s been. Truth is, Reign In Blood is still as garbage as it ever was.

reign-in-blood_1After having sired countless spawn across the globe for which it has paid a grand total of zero child support, hanging out at schools selling speed to generation after generation of teenagers, racking up numerous assault charges, flagrantly violating every form of noise restriction law, and essentially murdering everything in its class, Reign In Blood has proven itself to be the epitome of odious immorality. Eschewing the Sunday morning cafe conversations comparing health cover, raising children, and travel plans, Reign In Blood awakes with bloodshot eyes, tattered clothes, and reeking of an utterly repellent combination of sweat, smoke, and straight spirits. This is not a manifestation of some banal early-onset mid-life crisis-borne depression, no, this is simply all Reign has known in life. Belligerent aggression. Maniacal chaos. Unadulterated mayhem. Metal.

Regardless of whether you think its older brother Hell Awaits, or the more refined, well-mannered younger siblings South Of Heaven and Seasons In The Abyss are superior albums, to deny that Reign In Blood was Slayer’s most influential album would be severely misguided. Released on October 7th, 1986, these 10 tracks signified the band’s emergence into the public eye; the album charted with no radio play. I know this because I was a very industrious 2 year-old who spent every waking moment meticulously cataloguing every track played on the entire world’s collective radio stations during that time (*). Reign In Blood also marked the commencement of the band’s long-running working relationship with Rick Rubin, who had only previously worked with hip-hop artists and the like. Apparently, he’s a pretty big deal now too.

rick_rubin_sabbath221578

At this stage, it would be completely unnecessary for me to go through describing each track and tell you why they rule; you’ve heard, you know. If I could enumerate the exact number of brain cells I’ve decimated on an album by album basis, Reign In Blood would almost certainly be #1. That’s as good as any means for determining the personal significance of a piece of music in my (damaged) mind. The album’s profound influence in the metal genre is well documented, one only has to take a cross-section of the numerous tribute albums to the band to notice the abundance of songs from this single album. Instead of simply playing the original for the 9999th time, I’ve taken the liberty of compiling the album track-by-track via selecting what I believe to be the top 10 covers of the songs. Even just running through these few covers, it becomes clearly apparent the wide variety of sub-genres that owe some degree of gratitude to this rapid-fire 29 minutes of metal. There’s even a surprise live cover by some band that totally puts Slayer to shame (**).

250px-mohawk_picWhile we’re all ripping through the playlist, we’re each going to appease our nostalgia boners by talking about our personal experiences with the album. The first time I heard any part of Reign In Blood was most likely as a child watching Gremlins 2 on VHS for the umpteenth time; you know the part I’m talking about.  However, as a 6 year-old, even the concept of a riff was beyond me in 1990. My next run-in with the coveted “Angel Of Death” riff came through a somewhat unlikely medium – the MIDI.

After a year or so of sinking my teeth into Metallica and Iced Earth, I stumbled upon the MIDI files for the “Angel Of Death” and “South Of Heaven” main riffs while browsing the internet at friend’s house. You see, this was 1997, not everyone in my area had bothered to get the “world wide web” yet. We didn’t until about 1998 at my house. My friend had super lax parents. Needless to say, I saw some shit on this here internet thingy, but what I remember most vividly was the unprecedented access to new bands and their music. These sound sick even on MIDI, imagine what they sound like on guitar! I must have listened to those two files 20 times in a row that night. Upon one of my next visits to the record store, I managed to find copies of Reign In Blood, South Of Heaven, and the (then) just released Diabolus In Musica CD’s. After hopping in the back-seat of the car and promptly placing the disc in my shiny silver discman, I donned the earbuds and hit play on an album that would end up steering the next 18 years of my life.

Although at first, I was a little too timid to enjoy the constant “screaming” of Tom Araya’s vocals, the riffs were undeniably the most evil thing I’d ever heard. Relative to my prior experiences with the MIDI tracks and the vocal stylings of Hetfield, Barlow, et al., this was mind-blowing. Everything else now seemed to be a placid paddling pool; Reign In Blood was a tempestuous cascade of sulphurous vermillion falling from a precipitous wall of black clouds, directly into my ears, washing over my brain, and subsequently dissociating every atom within my skull. Fast, abrasive, addictive.

By a matter of sheer circumstance, the journey home from the shops was roughly equivalent to 25 minutes, and by the time I got to the album’s penultimate track “Postmortem”, a typically fierce spontaneous Sydney Summer storm had brewed that evening. I’m sure Mum wasn’t as oblivious to its onset as I, maybe that’s why the drive took a few minutes longer that day, it’s possible that she had slowed down through possessing some kind of personal concern towards our continued existence. The same existential regard I’d abandoned a mere 20 minutes earlier. What I do know is that just as the ominous intro to album closer “Raining Blood” commenced, there were lightning strikes flashing in closer succession to my location. It couldn’t have been more perfect timing. I’d never bought into the existence of a god; but at that moment, I bought into Slayer.

*shudders* Yeah, I just said that. Whatever, it was a really cool moment in my life. One of the few. By the time we hit the driveway at home, it was pelting with rain, and I sure as fuck wasn’t getting out before that song finished. For one, my precious discman would get wet! Secondly, my Mum probably said “we’ll just wait a minute”. Thirdly, I don’t think I’d brought my house keys. Fourthly, who the fuck are you, the Spanish Inquisition? I just didn’t get out, ok. Enough about me, I’ve asked a few of our writers to tell us what the album means to them.


Jason Kolkey

Here are the memories that come to mind when I think of Reign in Blood:

– Walking to school as a teenager, taking much comfort in having the chance to listen to the whole album on my Discman before dealing with the daily angst and travails of that age.
– Singing along to every track with strangers when some lazy sound guy decided to throw it on between sets at a show.
– And, of course, seeing the original lineup burn through the whole album at The Rave in Milwaukee, an experience that left me completely soaked in my own and others’ sweat.

Contrarians and revisionists will always have something to say against an album as widely beloved and influential as Reign in Blood. The outsize devotion many fans feel toward Slayer – mainly stemming from this record – invites derision from anyone who has dug deeper into the underground, as does the way the band has continued to be the most visible face of metal’s heavier side to the world’s plebs. Doesn’t matter. The riffs speak for themselves, as do all the band’s and songs that can trace their lineage to this release. And I truly consider “Angel of Death” one of mankind’s proudest achievements.


JAG

Talk about extreme metal… Reign In Blood *was* one of the few faces of extreme in 1986. At first I didn’t know what to think; there was talk of murder, satanic praise, and more murder.

My brother wore the original shirt and on the back it asked the question: “Do You Wanna Die?”. This whole album seemed to assure its listeners that not only will they indeed die, but possibly die a horrific death, and perhaps face an even more heinous afterlife.

Yeah, this album was 27 furious minutes of death and horror before death metal was really much of a thing. It was short enough that they repeated the entire album on the other side of the cassette tape. Nevertheless it was adequate, to the point, and left the listener feeling as though they’d heard a full album in spite of its brevity. The music and vocal delivery were so fast that one almost felt as though they were aboard a speeding freight train that was barely clinging to the railroad.

I was barely thirteen when Reign In Blood dropped; an adolescent who regularly attended Church and Sunday School. It scared the living shit out of me. Number of the Beast and Shout at the Devil were one thing, but this? This went too far. It went WAY too far and, by the time South of Heaven came out, I had somehow grown to love it.

Reign In Blood was, for me, a bitter cup to drink from. It was a masterpiece and a uniquely horrifying stroke of genius from a band who were formerly just a (better) copy of Venom. Reign In Blood is today a metal monument; one that will never be toppled by anyone. Thirty years later and the best any thrash or extreme metal band could ever hope for is “almost as good.”


Ron Deuce

My first exposure to Slayer was not this album, but Seasons In The Abyss, because my primary source for hearing new music was to sit up until 3am in the morning on a Saturday night and wait for the world’s most renowned poser, Riki Rachtman to play five minutes of good music during MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball, among the sea of glam rock and grunge that you could already hear during MTV’s regularly scheduled programming. I had only begun to dip my toes into thrash with the likes of Megadeth and Anthrax, so hearing Slayer at the time was hands down the heaviest thing out there to my ear-holes until death metal came through. Seasons invited me to explore Slayer’s back catalog and Reign In Blood was next up for my musical consumption.

What struck me about the record was not only its fierce and relentless attack, but also its brevity. While it’s commonplace nowadays for a band’s album to clock in around 25-30 minutes, this was not the case in 1986. Most metal bands were putting out full lengths of around 45 minutes to an hour. I never had any problem with the length because you always wanted more and if you had one of those tape decks that automatically flipped, then no action was needed on your part. Because the entire album was on one side of the cassette, you could just relax and let your ears get ravaged again. The thing about Slayer, and this record in particular, is that it is not exclusively cherished by metalheads alone; the punk kids like it, the hardcore kids like it, and probably a couple of yuppie hedge fund managers from Wall St. like it too. With that kind of broad appeal, it’s no wonder that those who place Reign In Blood on a pedestal use it as a measuring stick against other critically acclaimed albums whether that’s fair or not. Anyone who thinks Reign In Blood is not an iconic record is in the minority.


Now it’s your turn, let’s hear some of your thoughts on the album in the comments below! Maybe you have a favourite cover version that you wanna share with us?


* = No, you’re right, I did not actually do thisYou clever reader, you.

** = I couldn’t source a stand-alone cover of “Reborn”. 

(Image via, via, via)

  • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

    Such a ridiculous record. But 1986 was full of other amazing albums too.

    • My 1986 AotY / EotY list is already underway…

      This album is definitely on it.

      • Elegant Gazing Globe

        Will it have the Sumerlands record on it?

    • more beer

      Yea 86 was a really good year.

  • Wanna work out? Just cover this on the drums.

  • Señor Jefe El Rosa

    As a budding metalhead in my early teens, listening to mostly Pantera and Metallica, I was hungry for heavier metal each day. While on one of my research kicks I came across the band Slayer. The name alone evoked enough within me to spur an interest so I investigated further. Naturally, I would scour “best of” lists and found Reign in Blood near the top, if not THE top, of many lists. I then made it my mission to acquire the album. Fast forward a few months and I still didn’t have the album, 14 year old Boss the Ross didn’t know how to get his hands on one. On one faithful day, in a Best Buy with my grandma, I found it. At last, it would be mine. After convincing my grandma to get it for me, I couldn’t wait to give it a listen.

    I got home, inserted the disc into my portable CD player and smashed the play button. 28 minutes later my jaw was on the floor and my ears were ringing. I hadn’t heard music like this before. This was a whole other beast. The drums, the riffs, the tone, the ferocity, the speed, the technicality, the screams, the brashness, the brevity, the content was all new to me. So I listened to it again. And again. And again. Reign in Blood was a fluid beast of Heavy Metal greatness. It opened my ears to another level of heaviness that I was ready for and accepted thankfully.

    A side story: during my initial listen I was appalled that the album didn’t end after the fade out of “Raining Blood” As it turned out my copy, much to my relief, had 2 bonus tracks and I could go back to thinking this was a perfect album.

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      Those bonus tracks are totally worthless, in my opinion.

      • Señor Jefe El Rosa

        Agreed

    • tigeraid

      I went back to this evil shit well after being through Metallica’s first five albums, and even moreso than Metallica, Reign in Blood is what put me down the wormhole of metal forever. Metallica definitely kicked my ass, but I just HAD to know more about music that was this fucking angry and spoke to me so much as a young teen.

  • Megan Alexandra
    • God

      Clever and cool looking. I like it.

    • W.

      This would have been way cooler as an armpit tat. Just saying.

    • Heliocrat

      nazi

      • more beer

        You need two of those for it to be a Nazi thing.

  • Ayreonaut

    SLLLLLAAAAYYYYYEEEEEERRRRRRR

  • Abradolf Lincler

    i believe i still have a cd copy of this album from when i was a youngster somewhere

    • It’s been on my shelf for a couple of years now. I really need to pick up the vinyl at some point. This was one of those albums that I abused for about a year and then totally wanted nothing to do with. Hell Awaits is just my go to now. Now the urge to listen to RIB again is back.

  • God

    RAINING BLOOOOOOOOOD!!!!!
    FROM A LACERATED SKY!!!!

  • *AGGRESSIVE FARTING WITH APPROVAL*

    GL

  • Zeke

    I listened to divine intervention when I was jogging today. most people seem to think seasons was slayer’s last good album, but I think divine intervention is awesome. that is all, go back to posting about reign in blood now

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      I would totally agree. Divine is their last good album. The title cut, 213, Sex, Murder, Art, and Dittohead fucking rule.

      • Zeke

        sex, murder, art is my shit

      • Janitor Jim Duggan

        I used to own repressings of Divine Intervention and Diabolus In Musica on vinyl. I don’t know why but I sold them.

    • Señor Jefe El Rosa

      Good album, I would like to submit Undisputed Attitude as their last best, if we’re counting it.

      • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

        Mostly covers, nein!!

        • Señor Jefe El Rosa

          Was just checking!

      • Zeke

        I never really listened to it. by the time that album came out I was already onto death metal and black metal. didn’t have time for a slayer album of punk covers. I should give it a try

        • Señor Jefe El Rosa

          Is a good

        • Same wiith me, if anything, it’s Reign In Blood gone punk, but still absolutely sounds like Slayer.

          • Zeke

            giving it a try now

      • Ted Nü-Djent ™

        I will say World Painted Blood was

        • Señor Jefe El Rosa

          It was decent

          • Ted Nü-Djent ™

            Better production would have helped

          • Señor Jefe El Rosa

            Agreed

    • Max

      The popular wisdom that Divine Intervention is one of the weaker records (not helped by the band themselves saying so, admittedly) is a more recent development. Because at the time, I and everybody else I knew thought it was great, and all the reviews I read said the same. I still love it. In some ways it might even be my favourite.

      • Zeke

        mine too

  • Off topic, but one of my favorites.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5L7GyZeazM

    • King Shit of Fuck Mountain

      LOVE the production on that EP!!! So vicious!

    • Stanley

      Aggressive Perfector is the business.

  • Stanley

    Look at these babies. Ahhh. This album rips from start to finish, absolutely zero fucks given. A true landmark in my musical journey. Here’s my copy from 1986. I saw the band on the RIB tour at the Birmingham Odeon. One of the best shows I’ve ever been to.

    Now they suck.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/18a95539cb164f72ab97385b832b3f4eab68e0511ad789c1ae6968dcba4eca85.jpg

  • Janitor Jim Duggan

    I love this album. It’s one of my favorite metal albums ever and the best Slayer album hands down. Seasons In The Abyss is a close second and Divine Intervention is third.

  • One of my favorite live albums. I rocked this on my old Walkman to and from school a lot.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFVuSwzYlGk

    • Ayreonaut

      Man I jammed this all the time in high school. One of my favorite live albums.

    • I lucked the fuck out and got this for real cheap at a used CD store next to a bunch of Paul Simon and Rod Stewart sleep-aids.

    • Pentagram Sam

      Because of the MMMMMPACT Live After Death had on me, whenever it was time to get into a new band always used to try and get the live album first. This was the first Slayer album I got and the intro w Hell Awaits and the crowd noise made me feel like I was in a for reals seance.

      Slayer is one of those bands where the sum is much greater than its parts. Except for Dave fuckin Lombardo. Dude is inhuman

    • Óðinn

      Totally. Was in the crowd for that tour. Great live album, great live show.

  • I like Undisputed Attitude alot but that’s me.
    http://youtu.be/IXsOJsXpDcE

    • Señor Jefe El Rosa

      I absolutely love that album!

    • Abradolf Lincler

      I’m guilty of this everyday

    • Ayreonaut

      I got this album for a penny on Amazon seven years ago. No regrets at all

    • more beer

      That is a great album. They crush some serious punk classics. Plus it is all Hanneman’s influence on the band.

    • Ted Nü-Djent ™

      This article inspired me to listen to this today but not RIB. Go figure

  • Stanley

    Just listening to the album again and the bit in Post Mortem where the lyrics go, “Fatality, reality, await the final ccccccaaaaaaaalllllllllllllllll”, and the rifts that follow are priceless.

    • My favorite part still is when all the instruments cut out and it’s just double kick on Angel of Death. When I first heard that my dick almost exploded.

      • Stanley

        Of course. Absolutely iconic moment, right there.

        • We did a terrible cover of it in highschool and I insisted that the double bass pause be twice as long. Of course it was so shitty sounding and the pedal I used was this $30 piece of garbage that broke 3 months after I bought it. It was still the most fun ever, even though it sounded like garbage.

      • Waynecro

        That part DID explode my dick, bro. That’s why I didn’t have sex for the first time until I was 26. My dick took that many years to heal.

        • more beer

          JJD is that you?

      • Ted Nü-Djent ™

        almost?

    • Señor Jefe El Rosa

      Intro to Criminally Insane kills me every time

      • Stanley

        That’s how you ride a ride.

        • Señor Jefe El Rosa

          Love it.
          Also, Postmortem is how you falsetto a falsetto. Or something like that

  • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

    JAG: “It scared the living shit out of me.” Me too back in the day…it was too much to handle. The few kids I knew back then that wore slayer gear were a bit “off” like from huffing and shit.

    • Ayreonaut

      Getcha pull boi

    • more beer

      I had already seen Slayer 4 or 5 times by the time this record came out. Also Venom a few times by then. Along with all of the bands that would go on to be the Big 4. I was immersed in the underground pretty early on. I have never looked back. It has always been the heavier the better. Some things never change.

      • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

        Dude that’s awesome. I was just fucking around about the huffing. But they were heavy as fuck back then and you def were immersed early having seen then 4/5 times by the time this album came out. That’s kick ass. I was a Priest Maiden fanatic but these dudes initially freaked me out. Haha

        • more beer

          I knew you were fucking around about the huffing. I think a lot of what you were listening to back then. Had to do with the market you were in. I was in the biggest market pretty much New York. So there was a lot of variety and independent record stores. I can definitely see how they could have freaked people out in 86.

          • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

            Dude that is such a great call. I was in the suburbs of Chicago and you are 100% correct. The main access to heavy music for us in my area was metal hammer magazine and the retail box music stores. You nailed it, and I’m sure that why I saw so little Slayer gear. Ay my high school in the stoner/jock group I hung out with nobody listened to heavier music but Slayer was a different ballpark entirely.

          • more beer

            My friends and I were always in the city going to record stores and shows. Along with trading tapes. There was also a lot of word of mouth back then. It is much easier today with everything at your finger tips on the internet. In a lot of ways I think it was much more fun back then. Someone would tell you check something out then you would have to find it. Also all the people in bands were always out at shows handing out demos and show flyers. So you gt to know the bands because there was actual contact with them. Now they just put their new music on Bandcamp and it is very sterile. That personal interaction is gone.

          • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

            100% correct. We did the tape trading too but it was a limited universe with the fans of heavy in my area. We never made it to the international tape trading I hear about now with the death metal movement, we missed all of that where I was. You had to dig but it was fun and of course every metal head you met at shows or at school or work you had that connection, there were fewer of us back then and once you net the next step was to compare, share and talk bands. When I was in my 20’s we had a really cool all metal/hard rock club by my Jr college called The Thirsty Whale. It was kick ass lots of thrash bands from beginner to pro every weekend. Good times.

          • more beer

            Besides all of the places to go to shows in the city. We had a club called Streets in New Rochelle NY. Every band from those days played there. I saw so many good shows at that place from Napalm Deaths first US show to Death, Kreator, Suicidal. I saw so many really good bands in that place.

          • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

            Thats kick ass man. There was a really cool energy surrounding the whole movement back then…good fucking times.

          • more beer

            While I still love it and live it. It was way more exciting back then. But like everything else times change.

          • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

            Agreed. I think its great we stayed in the mix as we got older and shows how passionate we are and were about the music. I dont have a ton of friends my age now who even listen to new “rock” very often. A few things I’m not crazy about in today’s scene would be general admission at all shows which means you stand for 5 hours with 5 bands on the bill. The lack of filters and gates: anyone can blog, make music, share music, shoot videos, “create likes” and followers. Its good an bad, good in that I love creativity bad in that everyone is an expert and theres just way too much freaking music out between bandcamp, soundcloud, and eveything else which leads to bands sticking around for a few years and boom long gone. Everything is about right now and often created in this fake social media world with little permanence. Its kind of like the NFL, longer seasons, more teams, free agency and the salary cap watered down the quality of play (Washington wins NFC east at 6-10 last year lol). Call me old and discount my opinions its fine. Its fairly obvious if you lived through it…but that said we didnt walk away were still in it bro! Hats off to you!

          • more beer

            Hats off to you as well. Just because we get older we don’t stop living. I don’t know how people wake up and decide, I am done with the music I have listened to for so long. To me that isn’t an option. I still go to at least one show a week a lot of times more. As I have gotten older I have more disposable income. May as well spend it on something I enjoy. I have always gone to mostly ga shows so that isn’t really an issue for me. Plus most of the venues here have some sort of seats for us old guys. At my age I don’t pit anymore and a lot of times you will just find me at the bar checking out the bands. Even with all the social media, I think that the cream still rises to the top. A good bad is still a good band and a crappy band is still crappy. At least at our age we can tell the difference. What I do see a lot of now are scene interlopers. Hipster guys who suddenly like metal. I look at them and can tell they will not be around in a couple of years. But I know I will still be around. I have been doing this for so long. I really don’t know any other way. Keep doing what you are doing it keeps you feeling. Remember you are only as old as you mindset.

          • TrickleDownOvTacoKvltRiff

            Great stuff. I do the same at shows, hang back and chill. Great point the cream does rise to the top and there is a ton of kick ass metal out there with so much variety. As far as blogs go this is my choice of course the people here and vibe is top notch. I would enjoy a little more variety than Bandcamp and sooo much black metal BUT I dig that too and no where else do I feel more at home than here or find people MORE obsessed with metal than me. Great talkin man! Let’s keep flyin the flag!

          • more beer

            Always!

  • Janitor Jim Duggan

    Anyone who is a metalhead yet hasn’t heard Reign In Blood is doing it wrong. You haven’t lived until you’ve heard Reign In Blood.

    • I have not lived.

      • more beer

        Do not worry sir. He knows so little about living, it isn’t even funny.

        • It is actually kind of funny.

          • more beer

            Yea him telling anyone that is hilarious.

        • Janitor Jim Duggan

          Beer plz! I can’t help that my parents are overprotective and that I don’t have enough money to move out and live on my own!

    • Ted Nü-Djent ™

      JJD plz! jk, you’re 100% correct

  • I’m not a Slayer guy, but I think I dig more Hell Awaits. But, overall, you cannot deny the pioneers.

    Also, glad to see JAG’s input.

  • Sadistikexekution

    RiB gave/gives me a mindboner that puts Ronald Jeremy Hyatt to shame.

    SSSLLLLAAAAAAAYEEEEEEEERRR!!!!!!

  • ME GORAK™✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

    NOTHING TO SAY THAT NOT SAID ALREADY BUT REIGN IN BLOOD BADASS!!!!!!!
    & STILL REIGNING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    https://youtu.be/RE5FgxSWQOM

  • Lacertilian
  • Óðinn

    This is one of the few albums that I actually recall the day I bought it. I loved it so much that I brought over to my friends house where all my Metal friends would hang out. We listened to the album and, of course, got really drunk. Everybody thought it was the greatest thing they’d ever heard. I still remember waking up the next morning and one of my friends was playing a riff from Angel of Death on guitar. One of the most influential and flawless Metal albums of all-time.

    • more beer

      I still like Hell Awaits more.

    • “We listened to the album and, of course, we got really drunk, which was the thing to do at the time.”

      I call bullshit. This is still the thing to do 😛

      • more beer

        This for 30 years!

      • Óðinn

        Fair enough.

  • 365ChaosRiddenDays

    Great album, no doubts but records like “Show No Mercy” with “Hell Awaits” and “South of Heaven” and “Seasons in The Abyss” are also flawless and full of killer riffs and drumming, nasty and infectious:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CoGDjtBtVE

  • Hearing “Raining Blood” for the first time was one of those experiences where you can just FEEL your life changing

  • Waynecro

    Thanks for sharing your experiences with this album, bros. Hearing this album for the first time definitely altered my musical trajectory. RIB was a gateway drug to harder shit for sure.

  • Max

    I actually came to Slayer proper quite late, after I’d gotten into death and black metal first. I vaguely got into them around the time of Seasons, having heard “Dead Skin Mask” on the radio and being impressed by how desolately evil it sounded in relation to most other metal production jobs.

    Later that year I heard “Angel of Death” on the same station, but it was the live cut from Decade of Aggression. Liked it, but didn’t bother investigating until several years later after watching the Live Intrusion DVD. Then I finally obtained Reign in Blood – the legendary shortest, heaviest album I’d been hearing about from older metalheads.

    So I probably didn’t hear it in full until at least ten years after its release. And although the production had dated SLIGHTLY compared to the subsequent albums, it still held up a damn sight better than a lot of other ’80s metal records, and still does.

    I really recommend reading DX Ferris’s book about the making of Reign in Blood if you like this album.

  • Guppusmaximus

    To me, ‘Reign’ is Slayer’s ‘Ride’ and ‘South’ is their ‘MOP’. I cannot deny the influence this album has had on Thrash to this very day, yet, I think ‘SOH’ established the groove that made Thrash a lasting genre with its resurgence as of late and even surpassed Thrash and influenced Death Metal. IMHO, the first two albums were an evolution of Punk not a fusion like the crossover genre that started with Maiden which is what made Slayer and those albums pioneering & legendary.

  • atchdav
  • more beer

    So that means this week marks 30 years ago. That I saw the last Possessed show with the original lineup. After Possessed’s set there was a special guest. The special guest was Slayer using Possessed’s equipment. Tom was using Jeff Beccerra’s red bass. They did three songs Die by the Sword, Alter of Sacrifice, and Jesus Saves. Tom tried to get a very tough crowd at Lamour in Brooklyn to scream Jesus Saves. What he got was a whole lot of go fuck yourself. Slayer then tore the place up with a savage rendition of Jesus Saves. That was a sick show and one that has always stood out through the years.

    • Megan Alexandra

      Holy

    • Señor Jefe El Rosa

      Rad! Hahaha!

  • Akerskronks ov Steele

    Well let’s see as a 15 year old in 2011 or Some shit I found out about Slayer cuz other duds were like super into them. Of course Dlayer was their favorite band cuz what 15 year old would ever admit they like Anthrax more then Slayer? Alas I found out I liked Sodom a lot more.

  • Teresaamartinez1

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  • Jeff

    Great article. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the entire thing.
    I always thought Reign In Blood was an album ahead of its time. But after 30 years it’s obvious that this album has transcended time completely. Then it twisted, morphed, decapitated and violated time as it continues its Reign of blood